Leah Robinson

Dr. Leah Robinson

About

Dr. Leah Robinson is professor and program chair of Movement Science at the University of Michigan School of Kinesiology. She is director of the Child Movement, Activity, and Developmental Health Laboratory and a research professor at the Center for Human Growth and Development. Prior to her time at U-M, she was on the faculty of Auburn University's School of Kinesiology.

Dr. Robinson's research agenda takes a developmental approach to three complementary areas: motor skill acquisition, physical activity, and developmental health in preschool and school-age children. She seeks to understand the underlying mechanisms of motor skill acquisition, or, What drives a child’s ability to move? Leah implements interventions in school-based settings to maximize physical activity, motor skills, health, and development in pediatric populations. She then explores how these interventions contribute to children’s developmental trajectories. The overarching goal of her research is encouraging children to be physically active and to ensure that they enter school healthy, active, and ready to learn.

Dr. Robinson's grant funding has topped $3,000,000 and she is currently funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The NIH funding supports her research on A PATH (Promoting Activity and Trajectories of Health) for Children.

Dr. Robinson has more than 75 articles in peer-reviewed journals. Her articles appear in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, Health Psychology, Journal of Motor Learning and Development, Sports Medicine, and Child: Care, Health, and Development. She serves on the editorial boards of several journals, including Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport and Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy.

Dr. Robinson is a Fellow in the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM). Her other professional affiliations include African American Collaborative Obesity Research Network, American Heart Association, and North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity (NASPSPA).

Areas of interest

Assessment of motor performance and physical activity along with the implementation of evidence-based interventions to maximize physical activity, motor skills, and physical health and development in pediatric populations. The effect of evidence-based interventions on school/academic readiness and cognitive outcomes.

Contact

Leah
Robinson
CCRB 4745D
401 Washtenaw Ave.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2214
(734) 647-7645
(734) 936-1925

Classes

Course Course Title Credits Term Instructor
KINESLGY 423 Sensorimotor Development 3 Fall, Winter, As Arranged Robinson
Course Name RO: Sensorimot Dev
Course Level: Graduate
Description
The purpose of this course is to study major concepts and principles fundamental to the development of sensorimotor behavior from fetal to late childhood. The overall question for this class is: How and why patterns of motor behavior change? We will study subsystems that affect behavior in real time and over developmental time. This course is intended for pediatric practitioners as well as people interested in basic science issues. We will study the origins of new motor patterns as well as the improvement of motor performance with special emphasis in the development of the nervous system from fetal to early childhood life. We will discuss observable and 'classic' changes in motor skill that occur over time, and we will examine and discuss methods to assess motor performance.
Prerequisites: Graduate status; MOVESCI 320 or permission of instructor.
Component: LEC
MOVESCI 423 Sensorimotor Development 3 Fall, Winter, As Arranged Robinson
Course Name RO: Sensorimot Dev
Course Level: Undergraduate
Description
The purpose of this course is to study major concepts and principles fundamental to the development of sensorimotor behavior from fetal to late childhood. The overall question for this class is: How and why patterns of motor behavior change? We will study subsystems that affect behavior in real time and over developmental time. This course is intended for pediatric practitioners as well as people interested in basic science issues. We will study the origins of new motor patterns as well as the improvement of motor performance with special emphasis in the development of the nervous system from fetal to early childhood life. We will discuss observable and 'classic' changes in motor skill that occur over time, and we will examine and discuss methods to assess motor performance.
Prerequisites: MOVESCI 320 or permission of instructor.
Component: LEC
MOVESCI 429 Laboratory Rotation in Motor Control 1-3 Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer Robinson
Course Name RO: Lab Mtr Cnt Dev
Course Level: Undergraduate
Description
Students work in a professor's laboratory to learn research methods and participate in the scientific process. May be taken twice.
Prerequisites: MOVESCI 320; permission of instructor.
Component: LAB